Hundreds of thousands more flock to Connecticut parks

Associated Press Aug. 31, 2019 Updated: Aug. 31, 2019 7:44 a.m.Comments2

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Hundreds of thousands more people are visiting state beaches and parks, due in part to a two-year-old program that provides free admittance for vehicles with a Connecticut license plate.

Rough estimates indicate there has been an approximate 10% percent increase in traffic to the parks this season compared to last season, which was the first year of the Passport to Parks initiative, said Tom Tyler, director of state parks for the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

There was an estimated 10% jump in attendance in 2018 as well. Approximately 10 million visitors come to Connecticut state parks each year.

“We are seeing another very strong year,” said Tyler, noting there were “a ton of really hot, humid, sunny weekends” that likely contributed to the uptick as well. Tyler said there was also in increase in out-of-state parking fees of about 10%, which likely had a lot to do with the good beach weather.

Full article here

 

Vacancy Announcement – Director, Virginia State Parks

The opportunity

The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) seeks a leader and strategist in developing, directing, and promoting a statewide parks and outdoor recreation program as the Virginia State Parks Director.

Virginia State Parks works “to conserve the natural, scenic, historic and cultural resources of the Commonwealth and provide recreational and educational opportunities consistent with the good stewardship of these lands, waters and facilities that leaves them unimpaired for future generations” and is a nationally recognized leader in state park management, twice winning the National Gold Medal Award, and initiating a long list of exemplary programs including First Day Hikes, Youth Conservation Corps Program, Dark Sky designations, Park Rx America program, Pocahontas Rider Center and many more.

As the agency leader responsible for carrying out this mission, the State Parks Director manages a system of currently 38 parks that encompasses:

75,000 acres of conserved property; 55,000 acres of forest;
20,000+ programs and workshops; 2,060 campsites;

651 miles of trails;
488 miles of shoreline;
293 cabins;
36 lakes and ponds;
11 swimming beaches;
6 swimming pools; and
2 international dark sky sites.

Our parks can be found in locations among the highest mountains in the state all the way down to sea level with parks facing the Atlantic Ocean as well as the critical Chesapeake Bay estuary. Our parks can be found ideally-located on 8 major river{s; 4 major lakes; 4 rail trails; and 3 battlefield sites.

The natural resources of Virginia State Parks attract the visitation of over 10 million visitors annually; contributing an economic impact of over $200 million to the Commonwealth of Virginia.

The annual operating budget for the system is $45 million. A full time staff of 275 and a wage staff of over 1,000 during the prime season operate and manage the Virginia State Park system.

There are 6 districts within the system and State Park Headquarters is located in Main Street Centre in downtown Richmond, Virginia.

More details, full announcement here

 

Group working to get more African Americans to enjoy great outdoors

BY JENNIFER DEMOSS jdemoss@newsobserver.com

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Hikers take in the scenery after descending the steps during the Outdoor Afro trip to Eno River State Park.

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Hikers on the Eno River Outdoor Afro hike take a moment to cool off.

On a hot July afternoon at Eno River State Park in Durham, a group of hikers assembled. The day had been unbearably muggy, and a thunderstorm loomed in the distance. Despite the sweat streaming down a few faces, the group was there for a hike, and they weren’t giving up.

The hikers were part of the Raleigh-Durham network of “Outdoor Afro,” a national organization aimed at getting African Americans outdoors.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of Outdoor Afro’s conception in Oakland, California. Yanira Castro, the nonprofit’s communication director, said that last year Outdoor Afro connected about 35,000 people in the United States with nature through activities such as hiking, camping, rock climbing and cycling.

Outdoor Afro founder Rue Mapp first started what she called “a kitchen table blog” on her outdoor activities out of her Oakland home. She explained how she developed a love for the outdoors through her adoptive parents, who had left the Jim Crow South in the 1940s and built a rural paradise north of Oakland.

Mapp said the blog came about after she noticed that she didn’t always see a lot of other African Americans enjoying the outdoors or see many representations of that in advertising. When interest in her blog began to pick up, she put out a call for more African American leaders to begin guiding outdoor trips.

“I think there are these old stereotypes of black people that black people don’t swim or camp,” Castro explained. “Outdoor Afro shows people there are other people like you who you can go outside with and feel comfortable. We say it’s like finding your tribe.”

Beky Branagan was one of the first Outdoor Afro leaders, and she’s been exploring nature with participants in the Triangle area for eight years. The Raleigh-Durham network now has more than 3,000 members.

Branagan recalled an OA trip to hike Clingmans Dome in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. One of the hikers wasn’t in the best shape and decided she would rest on a bench while the rest walked to the top. But as the group was enjoying the view from the top, strangers began telling them the woman who had stayed behind was now headed their way.

“All of the people that just happened to be climbing that day were cheering her on her way up Clingmans Dome and she made it up,” said Branagan.

 

Full story

Rich in Surprises and Secrets, There’s a State Park Waiting for You

Across the Western United States, you’ll find them in all shapes and sizes, and often close to home, in part because President Lincoln thought everyone should have access to nature

By Peter Kujawinski

  • July 29, 2019
The sun sets at Bannack State Park in Montana.

On a cold and damp Iowa evening last October, I sat in a tent and thought about Abraham Lincoln. More precisely, I thought about Lincoln signing a minor piece of legislation deeding the Yosemite Valley to the state of California. It happened in 1864, while the Civil War raged. 

It is important because of just a few words. California was given ownership of Yosemite on the condition that the land “be held for public use, resort, and recreation.” This was the official approval of a remarkable and radical idea: Everyone should have access to nature. It led to our ecosystem of national and state parks, wilderness areas and nature preserves — all generally committed to providing this access. 

And it came at a time when President Lincoln presumably had a lot on his mind. Did he realize his signature would transform America’s relationship with nature?

That October night, I was camping in Iowa’s Waubonsie State Park, just one park among the many thousands now scattered across the United States. It was near the tail end of a yearlong mission to visit as many state parks as possible. (Final tally: 53.) This article, the second on state parks, focuses on those I visited in the western part of the country.Part 1: Parks in the Eastern U.S.

Waubonsie is a small state park in the southwestern corner of Iowa, near Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri. I didn’t know anything about it, except for reviews saying it was a good place for a picnic. I figured it’d be a few lonely trees surrounded by corn. What I found truly astounded me, and emphasized what I love most about state parks: You never know what you are going to find.

In this 1,990-acre state park, I found an ancient forest on a plateau, an island of mysterious trees in the middle of a vast agricultural region. A secret in plain sight. Waubonsie, as it turns out, is the result of glaciers melting and rushing down the nearby Missouri River. Silt from these glaciers has piled up in mounds large enough to become their own landforms, here called the Loess Hills. There are only two places in the world where this topography exists: the region where I was camping, and the Yellow River valley in China.

Full Story

Second in a series in the NY Times. First one:Wherever You Are, There’s a State Park NearbyJune 5, 2019

New York City’s Largest State Park Opens up in Brooklyn

In an attempt to promote outdoor activities, NYC’s new state park introduces impressive facilities and an even better view

 01 Min Read 

Cloudless skies, a spread of sandwiches and lemonade, a friendly game of frisbee and a light read; why not trade in the overdone routine of binge-watching Netflix for a relaxing day at the park? Especially a brand new one, yet to explore. New York City’s largest state park is now open to public use, just a brisk walk away for all Brooklyn residents. Sprawling across a massive 407 acres, Shirley Chisholm state park is named after the first African-American woman ever elected to congress.  With a bayside pier and a 10-mile trail dedicated to hiking and trekking, people can participate in active exercises or just gawk at the panoramic view of the Empire State Building over their picnic spread. Additionally, the park also has waterfront access for those who want to try their hand at kayaking. 

The state park received generous funding of $20 million under the first phase of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Vital Brooklyn Initiative. The second phase will potentially feature amphitheatres for live performances, environmental education centres, and a connector Bridge linking Pennsylvania and Fountain properties. It is a part of the state’s efforts to build 34 new and improved parks, community gardens, playgrounds, and recreation centres within 10 minutes distance for Central Brooklyn residents. Public meetings to discuss the design of phase 2 will begin in the fall of 2019, which is expected to be completed in 2020 and 2021.

According to the governor, state parks are central to New York’s thriving economy as these state-of-the-art natural treasures attract millions of tourists, as well as New Yorkers for entertainment, exercise and community engagement. He added that this investment will significantly enhance the facilities of the state parks, promote outdoor activities and lift up the local economy.

Gov. Cooper (NC) signs bill to officially create Pisgah View State Park

Karen Chávez, Asheville Citizen TimesPublished 4:40 p.m. ET July 20, 2019

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It’s official. Buncombe County will get its first state park, where residents will get a front-row seat for viewing Mount Pisgah and watching wildlife, hiking ridge lines, and maybe even take in a horseback ride.

On July 19, Gov. Roy Cooper signed into law SB 535, authorizing the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources to create Pisgah View State Park, which will be roughly 1,600 acres, sitting mostly in Candler, with a small parcel in Haywood County.

Earlier in the month the governor also signed into law two bills creating the Northern Peaks State Trail in Watauga and Ashe counties, the Wilderness Gateway State Trail in the South Mountains range in McDowell, Rutherford, Burke and Catawba counties, and the Overmountain Victory State Trail reaching across Avery, Mitchell, McDowell, Burke, Rutherford, Polk, Caldwell, Wilkes and Surry counties.

Mount Pisgah can be seen in the distance from Pisgah View Ranch, the site of what is set to become North Carolina's newest state park.

Mount Pisgah can be seen in the distance from Pisgah View Ranch, the site of what is set to become North Carolina’s newest state park. (Photo: Courtesy of Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy)

“These new parks and trails will conserve important wildlife habitats and support North Carolina’s flourishing outdoor recreation industry,” Cooper said in a statement.

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Murkowski: LWCF Can Do More for Conservation and Outdoor Recreation

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, today chaired a hearing of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee to review the implementation of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) program.

In her opening remarks, Murkowski noted that her 2019 lands package – the John D. Dingell Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act – contained a provision to permanently authorize LWCF’s collection and deposit functions and ensure that at least 40 percent of appropriated funding goes to the state-side program each yearPortrait of Lisa Murkowski

“Now that the collection and deposit functions of the LWCF have been permanently authorized – and we have made some important reforms – it is time to look at what has worked with the program and areas that can be improved,” Murkowski said. “Our challenge now is to think differently and more creatively about the LWCF. We need to ask what else it can accomplish for conservation and outdoor recreation in the future.” 

Lauren Imgrund, Deputy Secretary for Pennsylvania DNR and president of NASORLO, provided expert testimony on the stateside component of LWCF.

An archived video of today’s hearing can be found on the committee’s website.

Full Opening Statements and Links to Testimony 

Opening Remarks

Witness Panel 1

 

Delaware Governor Carney leads another Governor’s Campout!

Governor Carney, DNREC Secretary Garvin, Education Secretary Bunting join first-time campers at Governor’s Campout

FELTON – Governor John Carney, DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin, and Delaware Department of Education Secretary Susan Bunting joined a group of third-graders and their families from South Dover, W. Reily Brown, and Star Hill elementary schools, for the 4th annual Delaware Outdoor Family – Governor’s Campout at Killens Pond State Park over the weekend.

The Governor’s Campout, part of Great Outdoors Month, offers the opportunity for families to become more familiar with camping, and helps to strengthen the relationship between family members, the environment, parks, and the community. This year, DNREC’s Division of Parks & Recreation partnered with the Delaware Department of Education (DDOE), to focus on the importance of reading and science. The event was linked to the state Department of Education’s Next Generation Science Standards implementation, and the Governor’s and DDOE’s literacy initiative.

Full article

Girl Scouts Love State Parks




Division of State Parks  Indiana Department of Natural Resources
402 W. Washington St.Indianapolis, IN 46204-2748 
For immediate release: June 17, 2019 

Girl Scouts Love State Parks weekend is July 13-14

The National Association of State Park Directors (NASPD) and the Girl Scouts of America (GSUSA) will partner for the inaugural Girl Scouts Love State Parks weekend on July 13 and 14.

The weekend is designed to help thousands of girls across the United States explore nature, find adventure and learn what Girl Scouts is all about. Indiana State Parks will offer many options across the state to participate.

GSUSA is committed to developing a passion for outdoor adventure, healthy risk-taking, education and environmental conservation. During this weekend, they will host a variety of events at different state parks nationwide, where girls will be able to explore the outdoors, work on badges and projects or do many other activities.

Janet Holcomb, Indiana’s First Lady was a Girl Scout and supports the GSUSA and the new weekend promotion.

“I’m always eager for any opportunity to go outside and enjoy nature, especially in Indiana’s outstanding state parks, where you can hike, bike, fish, paddle, gather around a campfire, and more,” Holcomb said. “The Girl Scouts Love State Parks weekend is a terrific way for our state’s future leaders to foster a deep appreciation of the outdoors.”

Hosting events in Indiana are:July 13
• Fort Harrison State Park: Bug Badge at 10 a.m.
• Turkey Run State Park: Geology Hike through Rocky Hollow (water permitting) at 10 a.m.
• Ouabache State Park: Bison Feeding at 10 a.m. 
• Chain O’Lakes State Park: Slime Time: Animals Who Use/Make Slime to Survive at 5 p.m. 
• McCormick’s Creek State Park: Wildlife of McCormick’s from 1-4 p.m. (presentation, hike, cave exploration, and invasive pull).
• Potato Creek State Park: Birding at Potato Creek at 2 p.m.
• Indiana Dunes State Park: Full Moon Hike at 7:30 p.m. (presentation, then hike).
• Lincoln State Park: Abe’s Neighborhood Walk and cornhusk dolls at noon.
• Patoka Lake : Archery Lessons at 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., and 2:15 p.m. (space is limited at each lesson.)
July 14
• Lincoln State Park:  Abe’s Neighborhood Walk and cornhusk dolls at noon.
• Salamonie Lake: Live Raptors at 1 p.m.
All events are local time, and are open to all Girl Scouts. Some are open to families and friends, too. Exclusive Girl Scouts Love State Parks patches and merchandise will be available for participants at the Girl Scout Shop and participating council stores.

Registration is required through Indiana’s regional Girl Scout councils for all of these events. Links to council events pages are as follows:
Northern Indiana-Michiana: girlscoutsnorthernindiana-michiana.org/en/events/event-list.html
Central Indiana: girlscoutsindiana.org/en/events/girl-scouts-love-state-parks.html
Southwest Indiana: hgirlscouts-gssi.org/en/events/event-list.html 

Learn more about these Indiana events at calendar.dnr.IN.gov. More about the national event and GSUSA is at girlscouts.org. To see all dnr news releases, go to dnr.IN.gov.-30-
Media contact: Ginger Murphy, Deputy Director, Indiana State Parks, 317-232-4143, gmurphy@dnr.IN.gov

 

Girl Scouts – US and most of the state park systems have special events scheduled this
summer

Gold Medal Finalists; State Park Videos

The Gold Medal Awards for Excellence in Parks and Recreation are presented by the American Academy for Park and Recreation Administration in partnership with the National Recreation and Park Association, and proudly sponsored by Musco Lighting.

The Gold Medal Award honors communities throughout the United States that demonstrate excellence in long-range planning, resource management, and agency recognition. Awards are presented each year; the awards for the state park systems are presented biennially.

All the finalists for 2019, which includes state parks this year, plus more details may be found here. Congratulations to Florida, Maryland, Tennessee and Washington on being the state park systems finalists! The grand awards will be presented live at the opening session of the NRPA Conference in Baltimore on Tuesday, September 24.

Videos about their park system are included in the submissions as a part of their Gold Medal application. Click on the state for the video about their state park system:

Florida

Maryland

Tennessee

Washington

Congratulations to each for the quality park services they provide!

More info on AAPRA: American Academy for Parks and Recreation Administration